Exclusive: Buried report on rail access now available to download

Yesterday, we announced our discovery of a vital report on rail accessibility, commissioned by ATOC (now the Rail Delivery Group) and completed in May 2015. Nobody had viewed or even had knowledge of this document’s existence until now – despite the repeated calls from disabled people, campaigns like ABC and Transport for All, and even the Transport Select Committee; for proper oversight of disabled access during Southern Rail’s chaotic implementation of DOO.

It now seems that over a whole year of calling for impact assessments and a proper, transparent public discussion of the impact of DOO on disabled and older people; a report had already done just that and has been sitting in a drawer at the Rail Delivery Group for the past two years.

What does this mean for our legal case on Thursday?

The most ironic thing of all in the report coming to us at this time is the strong potential for legal challenge it clearly lays out. The Equality Act 2010 is a weak, ongoing process built by case law; and the breach of the Act occurring when Southern Rail runs unstaffed trains to unstaffed stations has already been said by many esteemed commentators and lawyers to be an extremely strong case if we can get it in front of a judge.

We urgently need your help to fund our ongoing investigations and actions and would greatly appreciate even the smallest donation or Facebook share of our Crowd Justice fundraiser.

With the Department for Transport preferring an “outcome-based” rather than a “compliance based” approach to the Equality Act, we believe that they not only exempt themselves from these rules, but rather fear new case law being made that will compel them to comply. The report states it is “highly likely” that this will happen and “likely” that this in turn will have an effect on the legal position regarding the provision of disabled access. It is up to us to make this happen.

A witness statement from last week

Both ABC and Transport for All receive regular, if not weekly, reports of access failures on Southern Rail. Here is the most recent we received; describing an experience that has become all too familiar to disabled passengers:

“I’m a wheelchair user. On the 23rd June 2017 I travelled from London to Brighton. I had booked ramp assistance for the outward journey three days in advance. But booking made no difference: platform staff at Victoria didn’t know about my booking, and when I arrived at Brighton, no one came with a ramp to get me off the train: station staff had absolutely no idea I was on the train. I was very angry. For my return journey, staff at Brighton promised to inform Victoria I was on my way. But on arrival at Victoria, again no one came to assist me with a ramp – no one had informed Victoria I was coming. These are NOT isolated incidents: it happens to me very often, and it’s upsetting and annoying and causes much anxiety. Southern Rail pays empty lip service to accessibility for all passengers, but the reality is that they don’t give a toss and refuse to implement policies and procedures which actually make the promised assistance solidly reliable.”

On Track for 2020? The Future of Accessible Rail Travel

The full report can be downloaded here:

On Track for 2020 – Full report

 

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Exclusive: ABC reveals buried RDG report on disabled access, which strongly advises keeping the guard on the train

Since launching an urgent crowdfunder for our ongoing legal action against the Department for Transport on Monday 19th June, we have received an anonymous package in the post.

The package contained a vital report on rail accessibility, commissioned by ATOC (now the Rail Delivery Group) and completed in May 2015. ‘On Track for 2020? The Future of Accessible Rail Travel’ has been kept under lock and key until now and we release it today in the belief that every disabled and older citizen in the UK has the right to be informed of its contents. It would appear that somebody within the rail industry thought so too.

Our researchers (a group of volunteer passengers) have now studied the report’s contents in depth – and discovered that it contains strongly termed advice about the anticipated effect of the nationwide trend towards DOO (driver only operated trains) on disabled and older people.

What’s so controversial about this report?

The contents of the report represent part of an argument over DOO that has received shamefully little attention by the press and politicians, many of whom have chosen instead to write off the unions’ concerns as “inexplicable”. We can no longer stand for the concerns of disabled and older people to be treated as “niche”; while out-of-context news about a “£75,000 offer” made to drivers is allowed to dominate the headlines.

We point towards the report’s own argument that the economic benefit of providing spontaneous access to disabled and older people actually far outweighs the cost. Of course, the economic argument is only necessary if the moral, societal, and legal ones are not enough! On the legal note, the report includes worrying implications in the statement that the Department for Transport prefers an “outcome-based” rather than a “compliance based” approach towards the Equality Act 2010.

The report supports ABC’s arguments by strongly distinguishing between metro and rural parts of the rail network, and stating that the practice of running unstaffed trains running to unstaffed stations is a breach of the Equality Act. It says definitively: “It is Conductors who are best placed to ensure that assistance is delivered effectively and in accordance with the law.”

Controversially, the report contains extensive discussion of the “clear trends” arising from the McNulty report in regard to de-staffing; and its authors repeatedly note their opposition to prospective policy changes that might allow unstaffed trains to run to unstaffed stations.

Why are we publishing?

It is clear that this is a high quality report, and one that was originally written for the benefit of both policy-makers and those who work on the railway. In addition to this, the near-total exclusion of disabled and older people from the DOO debate has gone on so long that we believe that the public has the right to view its recommendations.

The entrenched industrial dispute could also be solved right now with the provision of a proper”Guard Guarantee” – and this would have the benefit of ending industrial action on the Southern Rail network, just as it enters its second year.

‘On Track for 2020?’ is a comprehensive study and also covers aspects of rail accessibility about which its authors take a positive view. Because we have limited resources to reproduce our paper copies in full; we publish a set of extracts and an early synopsis of those issues around staffing and access that have been most relevant to our members. We also include copies of the report’s contents pages, executive summary and other documents; to redress the balance of our edited extracts, and demonstrate their context.

We have distributed the report to disability rights groups so that they may also contribute analysis according to their own areas of expertise. In addition to this, we will endeavour to produce a full digital version as soon as time and resources allow (unless of course the Rail Delivery Group wishes to respond by releasing the full publication).

Why has this report been buried for so long?

This discovery comes just days after the 6-month-delayed release of the Gibb report; just as journalists and MPs raise calls for a proper analysis of its editing decisions, and the release of the redacted Appendix Nine.

ABC’s disabled members have been very upset that the issue of disabled access was entirely absent from the Gibb Report. This issue has previously been absent from the RSSB report on DOO; as well as recent ORR publications, which focus mainly on the methodology of DOO and may not be providing adequate oversight of the activities of Southern Rail in regard to new staffing practices.

The Transport Select Committee emphasised the urgent need for a disability impact assessment on GTR in their November 2016 report, yet even now our campaign takes regular witness reports from disabled people who have been abandoned on trains and platforms by Southern Rail; often due to the absence of a second member of staff on board.

Ironically enough, the report makes for an excellent endorsement for our current legal case on disabled access, and notes that there is currently “very little case law” and that it is “highly likely that at some point relevant case law will be made”. It also states: “it is likely that case law will in future have an impact on accessibility”.

ABC’s resources are now stretched to the max! Please donate to our legal crowdfunder and share on social media

 

On Track for 2020? The Future of Accessible Rail Travel

Co-authored by Ann Frye Ltd, Rail Accessibility Ltd and MWW Transport Consultants.

Final Report, May 2015

This Report was commissioned by the Association of Train Operating Companies (now the Rail Delivery Group) to consider how accessible Britain’s railway network will be to older and disabled people by 1st January 2020 (the date by which all rolling stock must meet legal accessibility requirements).

Brief overview of the report’s contents regarding DOO and staffing – paraphrased as accurately as possible by the ABC team:

ABC analysis – briefest version

ABC’s own extracts from the report, with analysis

On Track for 2020 – with ABC analysis and extracts

A longer document of relevant extracts, including page numbers and references

On Track for 2020 The Future of Accessible Rail Travel – extracts with page refs and footnotes

Image documents:

Cover page

Contents

Executive Summary

Annex One The Legal Framework

Annex Two Organisations Consulted

Annex Three Project Team

 

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To donate to our legal crowdfunder, or get up to date on our legal news, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal Update: Transport for All to intervene in ABC’s judicial review

Work continues towards our judicial review and we are delighted to announce that the disabled and older people’s charity Transport for All has now asked to intervene in the case. Transport for All have written today to the Royal Court of Justice, to express their interest in submitting further witness statements expressing the full range of assistance failures disabled people have had to deal with during the tenure of Southern Rail.

Like ABC, Transport for All has received dozens of complaints from people experiencing regular failures of assistance on Southern Rail. They are now being represented by Chris Fry of Fry Law on the matter – the very same team behind Doug Paulley’s recent victory for bus accessibility at the Supreme Court.

It is the first time that the Secretary of State’s obligations, as relates to the Equality Act and rail franchising, will come in front of the Court; meaning that the case is very likely to be precedent-setting for rail transport. ABC could not be happier to hear that such a well-respected organisation and law firm will now be joining the case.

With in-depth legal work continuing on the Equality of Access issue, we have also made some minor amendments to the case this month. Such amendments are not unusual in the judicial review process, which is rather less combative than regular litigation. This means that our new deadline for a response from the DfT is now 23rd March. Given this delay, we do not believe the Court will find any further extension requests from the DfT to be reasonable. We feel confident, therefore, that we will have their response by 23rd March, and it will then be a matter of awaiting the Court’s decision on whether the judicial review can proceed.

Statement from Transport for All

Accessible public transport is a life-line to inclusion for many disabled people who disproportionately rely on it to go about their everyday lives. The Southern Rail crisis has caused disruption and misery to disabled and older people, leaving many unable to travel to work and increasingly isolated. Yet throughout the strikes the Department for Transport has remained silent on this issue.

This case would be the first test case to the Secretary of State’s duty to uphold Disability Equality in the franchising process, and could cause a seismic shift in the Department for Transport’s approach to protecting the rights of disabled and older people.

Transport for All hope that our experience in the wide range of obstacles disabled and older people can face when accessing the transport network, and the impact of Southern Rail’s failures on our ability to travel will assist the court when they consider the case.

Transport for All’s accessible transport hotline receives dozens of calls from disabled and older people who find themselves unable to access the rail network because they simply can’t rely on assistance from staff.

“On roughly two-thirds of my journeys, when I arrive at Victoria there is no one there to assist me with a ramp, even though the staff at my home station have phoned ahead to let Southern Rail staff at Victoria know. So I end up stuck on the train” commented Chris Stapleton, a wheelchair user. “The effect of Southern’s unreliable assistance is that every train journey becomes horribly stressful, and every time I arrive at my destination I have a tight knot of anxiety in my stomach – will there be someone with a ramp to assist me? Will I be locked into the train again, or have to get random strangers to go and hunt for staff, or be forced to shout or press the emergency alarm?”

For more information or comment please contact catherine@transportforall.org.uk

Have you been affected by accessibility issues on Southern Rail?

If so, please do get in touch with Transport for All, or email Catherine directly on catherine@transportforall.org.uk.

You can also report your experience to ABC via contact@associationofbritishcommuters.com. We will then let you know when we will be taking further witness statements.

Donations to our legal campaign

Our next round of crowdfunding for the case will open after we receive permission from the Court. In the meantime, we are running a big campaign on very slim resources. If you are in a position to donate to ABC, you can do so here.

Equality of Access Crisis: Disabled passengers deserve answers – Letter to Charles Horton from ABCD

ABCD is a group of disabled passengers within the ABC community who wish to raise their voices on the access problems they are facing on Southern Rail. The removal of guaranteed assistance has been feared for months now, and many people now feel they are victims of indirect discrimination through the loss of spontaneous travel.

The following letter has been dispatched to the CEO of Southern Rail, Charles Horton, and asks him to properly address the impact of the changes his company is implementing. It has also been copied to the Rail Delivery Group, and the Ministers for Transport, Rail and Disabled People. If you have been affected by the incidents described in the letter, please scroll to the end to find out how to send your own version.

Dear Mr. Horton,

We at ABCD (Association of British Commuters Disabled Passengers) are very concerned about the discriminatory nature of the latest Exceptional Circumstances list within the Aslef train driver agreement.

Southern Rail recently rolled back the provision of ‘turn up and go’ travel from 33 stations to zero, and we are incredibly concerned that they are taking this regrettable backwards step in accessibility. We believe this contravenes the Public Sector Equality Duty under the Equality Act 2010, and the protections from discrimination assured by the Human Rights Act 1998.

ABCD is also deeply concerned about a recent RAIL magazine article where a Southern Rail spokesperson suggested that “only” those in wheelchairs would be inconvenienced by not having an OBS onboard – a comment we find deeply offensive.  Passengers with a range of physical and mental disabilities are disadvantaged by not having an OBS on board. The spokesperson’s comment, separating disabled people into “types”, is highly discriminatory in nature.

Disabled people should be treated equally no matter their impairment; removing the guaranteed second person from the train removes the rights of disabled people to work and enjoy leisure time just like any other member of society. We have made great strides in UK transport since the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 was introduced, and now Southern Rail wants to turn the clock back.

Thanks to Southern always having a guard on their longer distance services, we were able to travel spontaneously before the removal of guards.  Since the OBS system has come in, there have been countless stories of disabled passengers being left on the train at unstaffed stations, left stranded on platforms and insufficient support for transition to follow on journeys.

We have been told that we can book 24 hours in advance for support; however, this advance booking has been well known for its unreliability, particularly in recent journeys made by our members on Southern. As most services in the UK have a guaranteed second person, there shouldn’t be a need to book 24 hours in advance; which rules out all chance for a disabled person to live a spontaneous life.

We ask you to remember that disabled people don’t just live at the beginning of a route, so if a train goes without an OBS, it will affect those down the whole line, wherever they decide to get on and off anywhere on that route. This also applies to the OBS who change during the route, for example, we may have an OBS from say London Victoria to Three Bridges, but then another one from Three Bridges to Bognor Regis. Drivers often do not seem to know whether they have an OBS onboard or not until the last minute, and have been caught in many situations where they have been put in the dilemma of stopping the train and providing assistance, or leaving a wheelchair user behind on the platform.

The removal of guaranteed assistance and scrapping of ‘turn up and go’ is having a huge impact on disabled people’s lives. We are constantly worrying about every stage of our journey, not knowing if we can get on or off a train, or if there will be assistance at our destination station. This is leading to worsening mental health issues and a great deal of worry, because having a guaranteed second person is essential for our peace of mind and personal security. The additional anxiety, and extra physical and mental exhaustion in navigating travel, is likely to exacerbate disabled people’s impairments further.

We have heard of wheelchair users and other helpful passengers throwing themselves between doors to prevent the train departing, or even breaking into the guard’s cupboard to assist disabled passengers. On Thursday evening at Victoria station, a Southern Rail driver chastised a wheelchair user in front of a carriage full of passengers, saying “he has been told he should not be travelling at night”. With all that Southern Rail is doing in removing the right to ‘turn up and go’ travel, it is hard to avoid seeing this as a reflection of company culture.

Since it is now well known that issues around staffing and DOO are not solely the decision of the train operating company, we must address the Department for Transport too. Surely it is in the government’s interests to keep the second person on every train as this would aid people of various disabilities to get a job/keep their job, strengthening UK plc as well as reducing the reliance on benefits. There are numerous reports on the economic benefits of a disability-inclusive approach, without even mentioning the moral dimension.

We urge Charles Horton to think about the repercussions of these changes on others, who may be totally reliant on public transport. On behalf of ABCD members we would ask you to reconsider the damaging implications for disabled and less able passengers, and make the reasonable adjustments necessary to comply with your duties; considering this within the exceptional circumstances list specifically.

We look forward to your reply and ask that you address the matter of the precedents being set for disabled access, rather than repeating platitudes. The repeated assurance that there will be ‘more customer service than ever before’ does not hold weight when we are seeing the right to ‘turn up and go’ travel removed, and hearing regularly of discriminatory comments and actions from Southern Rail.

Sincerely,

James Welling, Sarah McStravick, Tilly Simmonds, Kaye McIntosh, Jo Bayly, Steve Salford, Edward Vermeer

on behalf of: Association of British Commuters Disabled Passengers

 

Fellow Southern Rail passengers who have been affected by access failures on Southern Rail are welcome to send their own copy of this letter, or use it as a template. If you would also like to sign this letter publicly, please let us know through our contact form.

Address the letter to Charles Horton, CEO of Southern Rail:

charles.horton@gtrailway.com

Copy the letter to:

CEO of Rail Delivery Group: paul.plummer@raildeliverygroup.com; Minister for Transport: chris.grayling@dft.gsi.gov.uk; Minister for Rail: paul.maynard@dft.gsi.gov.uk; Minister for Disabled People: penny.mordaunt.mp@parliament.uk.

 

Southern Rail’s Equality of Access Crisis – Ann Bates OBE speaks out (Part Two)

After campaigning for months on the crisis of Equality of Access on Southern Rail, ABC believes that this issue can be ignored no longer. Extensive work is underway with witnesses who have experienced the failings of Southern Rail’s system, and we are soon to take the government to court in a precedent-setting case for disability access. Today, in Part Two of our blog series, we bring you the expert analysis of former DfT and Govia advisor Ann Bates, who was granted an OBE for her contributions to the field.

Statement from Ann Bates, OBE:

“I was Chair of the Rail Group at the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee (at the Department for Transport) for nine years and have worked with government, train companies, statutory agencies and other parties to ensure the full accessibility of the rail network for all passengers with the whole range of disabilities – not just wheelchair users, most of whom rely on staffing either on the train or the station for assistance.

The parties involved in the present dispute have not provided any robust solution to the ‘unstaffed train calling at an unstaffed station’ problem.  Various solutions have been proposed, all of which depend on a slick communication level that has been proven absent throughout the dispute, or negative experiences offered such as long distance taxi rides (mostly not available on the coast and many unable to fit a larger wheelchair inside), waiting on an unstaffed platform in all weathers trying to use an information point (impossible with a hearing loss), or being forced to change at another station to ‘await a staffed service’.

None of these options meet the test of ‘reasonableness’ required by the law as we will be delayed (sometimes by hours) and treated far worse than other passengers who can take trains straight through to their destination.

I have campaigned for the ‘level playing field’ concept where we get no positive discrimination, but the current plans will leave me in a more uncomfortable, more uncertain and more delayed situation than I was in travelling in the guards van all those years ago. Twenty years ago I was in the guards van, now I’m not even on the train!”

 

For Part One of our series on Equality of Access, click here.

If you have been affected by access failures on Southern Rail, please write to us at contact@associationofbritishcommuters.com

Equality of Access Crisis on Southern Rail – Rail Industry take heed! (Part One)

The news of a potential resolution to the Aslef dispute has created a new level of stress and worry for disabled passengers. Documents leaked yesterday show that the list of agreed ‘exceptional circumstances’, where a train will run in driver-only mode, have actually increased since earlier discussions. To this day, there has been no meaningful effort by Southern Rail to address the concerns of disabled passengers, and we simply cannot allow this to continue.

ABC has received an abundance of witness reports of the failings of Southern Rail’s system for access – far too many to fit into one blog. Thus, we now commence a series – bringing you in-depth comments from some of the sharpest minds on this issue; many of whom have also suffered at the hands of Southern Rail. Today’s Part One presents a background to the problem and the investigations we have conducted so far.

Part One: a background to the problem

ABC’s application for a judicial review of the Department for Transport was annouced last week, which aims to set a legal precedent for Equality of Access on public transport, as well as questioning the lawfulness of the DfT’s overall handling of the Southern Rail management contract.

The precedent we are concerned with is simple – just who is responsible for enforcing the Equality Act 2010 regarding the right to access public transport? The Secretary of State for Transport has denied to our lawyers that this is his department’s duty, and a train operating company is on record as saying “ultimately, we’ll be tested in the courts won’t we?”

This controversial issue was the subject of a recent conference on rail hosted by Transport for All, where ABC and others went head to head with the Rail Delivery Group – attempting to seek a clear answer on a very simple question: “just who is responsible for ensuring the right to equality of access on transport?” Fuller coverage of the issue, and what happened at the conference, can be found in an excellent report by John Pring of the Disability News Service.

We believe that this problem is well-acknowledged by the rail industry as a whole and suspect they must be very embarrassed by Southern Rail’s conduct, which is a further source of shame for UK rail. We would venture to suggest, however, that it is the situation with Southern Rail specifically that is the source of this shame. Elsewhere in rail, steady progress is being made through efforts such as the Department for Transport’s Access for All program, and the Persons with Reduced Mobility regulations, which require all vehicles to be fully accessible by January 2020. In other words, the renegade Southern Rail seems to be going against the grain of the rail industry itself (the target of fully accessible vehicles means very little when there is no assurance of adequate staffing or communications).

The changes made by Southern Rail have been quietly revealed through new maps requiring advance booking at every station on the network. ‘Turn up and go’ travel was previously guaranteed at 33 stations on Southern Rail, and there is no way of defending this move as anything but a step back for accessibility. Charles Horton, CEO of Southern Rail, has defended it nonetheless and has simply written off the news of this very troubling revelation as: ‘profoundly misleading’. His letter in the Guardian last month received several shocked responses from members of our campaign, and he has yet to engage with our concerns in any meaningful way whatsoever.

Equality of Access: voices from the industry

The issue of the industry’s confusion on equality of access gained landmark coverage in November’s Modern Railways magazine, which included a number of contradictory statements from TOC managers. An unnamed company, when asked how it would provide assistance in the case of trains being run in driver-only mode, said:

‘The good thing would be that all of the regular passengers would still be carried, it would only be the wheelchair users who wouldn’t be able to travel’.

The article continues:

But what if that wheelchair user had booked ahead for an important event? And it’s not just wheelchairs that need the ramp down. What about those who can walk, but only with support such as a stick or frame? And so on. The grey area demands more rigorous thinking on the part of the industry. One train operating company (TOC) Managing Director told us: ‘Societal expectations are rising all the time; ultimately we’ll be tested in the courts won’t we?’

There are echoes of the same sentiment in an article from this month’s Rail Magazine, where we see Southern Rail’s head of customer experience, Kerri Ricketts, making a highly controversial division between people with different ‘types’ of disabilities, again calling on the sentiment that it will ‘only’ be wheelchair users who are disadvantaged by the absence of onboard staff:

“…when an OBS is not available most disabled users benefit from the train continuing to run with just the driver, rather than cancelling the service and forcing all passengers to cram onto a following train. [Ricketts] said that only wheelchair users would gain from transferring onto the next service. Passengers with other disabilities – for example, those less physically impaired, blind, deaf, or mentally imparied – would be best served by continuing to travel.”

Ricketts also said that on average 1 in 1,750 trains would operate under these circumstances – fewer than one train per day. We at ABC feel that this statistic is to be taken with more than a grain of salt – if these are really the odds we are looking at, why has one local wheelchair user been left behind (and abandoned for up to two hours) on platforms three times in January alone?

It is vital that we raise this issue now and compel Southern Rail, the Department for Transport, the Rail Delivery Group and others to start playing a meaningful part in this discussion. They cannot continue to deny the reality of a problem that is so very clear and urgent to lawyers, access experts and disabled users.

We feel that the needs of the less mobile must be conceived of much more widely, and take into account the intersection of disabilities that is, most controversially, ignored by the comments quoted above. The European model uses a concept of PRM (Persons with Reduced Mobility) and includes mothers with children, pregant women and all disabilities in its scope. This is surely a much more progressive way to address this issue, than the callous division of disabilities into categories whereby, it is ‘only wheelchair users’ who will suffer. If the rail industry is truly seeking to modernise, it needs to urgently get with the times – the comments above make abundantly clear that Southern Rail has no concern for the realities of discrimination law.

Parts Two and Three of our series brings together contributions from experts, including members of the ABCD (Association of British Commuters Disabled Passengers), and we will be publishing these throughout the week. In every case, we will forward our publications to Southern Rail, the Rail Delivery Group and others, and ask them for an urgent and transparent response to our concerns.

If you have been personally affected by the problem of access on Southern Rail, please write to us at contact@associationofbritishcommuters.com

 

 

Transport for All? – ABC to sit down with RDG and Govia reps to discuss accessibility on Southern Rail

We are honoured to have been invited to Transport for All’s rail accessibility conference, which will be held at the SCOPE headquarters in London on Tuesday 13th December. ABC campaigner Emily Yates will be joining the panel; alongside accessibility expert Ann Bates OBE, and accessibility managers from Govia Thameslink Railway and the Rail Delivery Group.

The event will open with presentations from TfA Chair, Alan Benson, detailing the campaign’s concerns; and Campaign for Better Transport’s Lianna Etkind, who’ll be speaking on the topic of rail franchising. The day concludes with the 90-minute panel discussion – which should be ample time to raise our concerns with the persons directly responsible for providing access on the railways.

We have been concerned for some time over the lack of foresight given to access requirements, amid the very hasty roll-out of Driver Only Operation in the South. The On Board Supervisor role was just recently adapted to accommodate wheelchair users, and the needs of disabled passengers received only a single passing mention in the RSSB report on the matter.

We are also aware that a new map has been introduced on the 377 trains – indicating compulsory advance booking all over the network. This, we believe, represents a clear breach of the Equality Act.

new-access-map

The Transport for All conference is open to its members, and representatives from the rail industry. However, Emily will be able to bring a select few guests – so, if you are really keen to attend, do get in touch.

For more information on Transport for All, click here.