The ‘Great British Rip-Off’ – why new ‘flexi-tickets’ are an insult to passengers

The Department for Transport’s new ‘flexible season tickets’ are an absolute insult to passengers. Neither cheap nor flexible, they are just another pricing trap for a captive commuter market – and in some cases, could see passengers paying even more.

The ‘flexi-tickets’ exclude London travelcard, Merseyrail, and journeys within Wales and Scotland (including all cross-border journeys originating outside England). Hardly the integrated and comprehensive new ticketing system we’ve been promised. As the first significant policy rolled out from the Williams Rail Review, it’s a really bad sign of what’s yet to come from ‘Great British Railways’.

Bulk buy tickets with highly variable discounts

The new ‘flexi-tickets’ are packs of eight ‘one-day season tickets’ for use within a 28 day period (excluding free weekend travel). The discounts when compared to the price of an anytime day ticket are highly variable across the country – so far, we’ve spotted examples ranging between 7% and 20%, and we think there could be many more surprises to come.

Because the new system replaces existing carnet tickets, this may even lead to price rises for some commuters. Ironically, Grant Shapp’s own constituency of Welwyn Garden City is one of these anomalies, where commuters will see an 18.5% rise on carnet tickets under the new system. Previously, there was no evening peak on that line, so a carnet ticket came in at £14.80 per day – under the new system of ‘flexi tickets’ this has risen to £17.55 per day

A rigid and inflexible ticketing system

In many of the cases we’ve seen the new flexi-ticket only makes financial sense if you know for sure you are going to travel two days a week (or eight journeys per month). Three-day per week commuters are likely to be better off on a weekly or monthly season ticket. And even two-day per week commuters would only need a couple of extra trips for a monthly season ticket to have been more cost-effective. Whereas we’ve spotted a few examples of local journeys where flexi-tickets are cheaper for three days per week, the discount level seems to get radically worse the longer the commute.

This is a rigid, bulk buy form of ticketing with no price-capping that will actually disincentivise additional rail travel for those who use it. And let’s not forget, if you choose the ‘flexi-ticket’, you’re missing out on free weekend travel too.

Here’s how the price trap works:

A £45.23 Brighton to London Victoria flexi-ticket provides a 20% discount on the anytime return of £56.40. At three days per week the daily cost becomes £39.27 on a weekly season ticket, £34.83 on a monthly, and £30.23 on an annual.

From Reading to London terminals, the £43.90 per trip flexi-ticket provides a 12.5% discount on the £50.20 anytime return. At three days per week the daily cost on a weekly season ticket is £40.53 per trip, on a monthly £35.92 and on an annual £30.23.

In conclusion…

The so-called ‘flexi season tickets’ are little more than a PR stunt from the government and rail industry. Neither cheap nor flexible, they are just another pricing trap for the captive commuter market – in other words, an absolute con.

It’s no wonder then that the government is being so obscure about the exact level of discount involved in the flexi-season tickets, attempting to claim “20% off a monthly season ticket” as their comparator and neglecting to mention that this applies only in the most rigid of circumstances for a two day per week commuter.

There’s now increasing suspicion that some could even be paying more under this new system. No doubt further pricing anomalies will emerge as commuters flock to National Rail Enquiries to figure out the value of a flexi-ticket for their area.

At a time of recovery from covid, commuters need more convenience and flexibility than ever as workers and businesses figure out what’s right for them. The new so-called ‘flexi-tickets’ are only going to impede this process, and may even discourage people from returning to rail at all.

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